7 syllable words

Wow . . . the hive-mind truly is impressive. The best I could come up with was “anti-globalization.” (Then again, that’s better than my best 16-letter word, which was “underwaterfridge.”)
For question number 2 (most commonly misspelled word by otherwise good spellers) I’d vote “foilage,” which is often misspelled “foliage.”

7 syllable words, Language Skills Abroad
It’s always so much fun listening and watching our young readers figure out those “longer” words. Many of our little ones are pretty solid decoding one-syllabe words and are now ready to learn strategies for decoding multisyllabic words. So, really, what is a syllable? Simply put, a syllable is a unit of pronunciation containing a single vowel sound. “Syllabication” is the process of analyzing the pattern of vowels and consonants in a word to determine where a word is broken into its syllables. The ability to break a word into syllables helps students decode those longer words as well as helps the student remember spelling patterns. Understanding the 7 syllable types helps students to become better readers and writers.
There are 7 types of syllables that occur in all words of the English language. Every word can be broken down into these syllables. These 7 syllables include: closed, open, magic e, vowel teams, r-controlled, dipthongs and consonant le. After teaching each syllable type, having these posters readily available for reference in your classroom can help your students. The Make, Take & Teach 7 Syllables Types Classroom Posters can be downloaded for free in my TpT store.

7 syllable words, Language Skills Abroad

  • me (no consonant at the end; the vowel is long and “says its name”)
  • robot (the first syllable is “ro” and is open; the second syllable is closed -> ro/bot)

Word examples:

7 syllable words, Language Skills Abroad
That’s why we’re here to help in the third episode, which covers rules six and seven. These mini-posts go into a bit of detail concerning the rules, so there’s no confusion for you or your students!
Ready to dive in? Us too!

Here is a list of two-syllable words:

  • able, alive, apple, away, better, broken, city, country, daily, early, easy, even, evil, fifty, forward, freedom, future, happy, human, hungry, joyful, language, little, loving, lucky, many, music, nature, office, open, other, over, party, perfect, picture, public, pumpkin, safe, simple, solid, special, stupid, sugar, thirsty, ugly, welcome, woman

These words are described as “disyllabic” or “dissyllabic” (avoid “bisyllabic”).
Examples:

  • be, flu, go, hi, she, hero, potato

In the following words, only the bolded syllables are open syllables:

  • music, paper, tiger, bingo

A line with an esdrъjula ending can rhyme assonantially with a grave word (disregarding the second-to-last vowel of the esdrъjula):
Sinalefa only applies within the line, not between one line and the next, even if there is encabalgamiento (enjambement — no punctuation) between the lines in question and they would be read without a noticeable pause.

More precisely, for each word length from 1 letter to 20 letters, find words of that length containing as many and as few syllables as possible.
1 letter: min 1 syllable (credit JLee/Prem), max 1 syllable (credit JLee/Prem), ratio 1
2 letters: min 1 syllable (credit JLee/Prem), max 2 syllables (credit JLee/Prem), ratio 2
3 letters: min 1 syllable (credit JLee/Prem), max 2 syllables (credit JLee/Prem), ratio 2
4 letters: min 1 syllable (credit JLee/Prem), max 3 syllables (credit JLee/Prem), ratio 2
5 letters: min 1 syllable (credit JLee/Prem), max 3 syllables (credit JLee/Prem), ratio 3
6 letters: min 1 syllable (credit JLee/Prem), max 4 syllables (credit JoeZ), ratio 4
7 letters: min 1 syllable (credit JLee/Prem), max 5 syllables (credit user13433), ratio 5
8 letters: min 1 syllable (credit JLee/Prem), max 5 syllables (credit JLee), ratio 5
9 letters: min 1 syllable (credit JLee/Prem), max 5 syllables (credit JLee), ratio 5
10 letters: min 1 syllable (credit Deusovi), max 6 syllables (credit JLee), ratio 6
11 letters: min 1 syllable (credit Emrakul), max 6 syllables (credit JLee/Prem), ratio 6
12 letters: min 1 syllable (credit Emrakul), max 7 syllables (credit JLee/Prem), ratio 7
13 letters: min 2 syllables (credit Prem), max 8 syllables (credit JLee), ratio 4
14 letters: min 2 syllables (credit Prem), max 8 syllables (credit JLee), ratio 4
15 letters: min 3 syllables (credit JLee/Prem), max 8 syllables (credit JLee), ratio 2.666.
16 letters: min 3 syllables (credit Prem), max 8 syllables (credit Prem), ratio 2.666.
17 letters: min 3 syllables (credit Prem), max 8 syllables (credit Prem), ratio 2.666.
18 letters: min 4 syllables (credit Prem), max 9 syllables (credit Nathaniel), ratio 2 .25
19 letters: min 4 syllables (credit Prem), max 9 syllables (credit Prem), ratio 2.25
20 letters: min 5 syllables (credit Prem), max 10 syllables (credit Prem), ratio 2

Resources:

http://blog.maketaketeach.com/7-syllable-types-classroom-posters/
http://learningattheprimarypond.com/blog/the-6-syllable-types-what-they-are-why-they-matter-and-when-to-teach-them/
http://factsumo.com/blog/6-7-syllable-rules/
http://www.grammar-monster.com/glossary/syllable.htm
http://community.dur.ac.uk/m.p.thompson/verse.htm
http://puzzling.stackexchange.com/questions/16760/words-with-most-and-fewest-syllables-for-given-length
http://statmodeling.stat.columbia.edu/2008/06/27/what_is_the_sev/