buddhism commandments

buddhism commandments, Language Skills Abroad
4) To undertake the training to refrain from false speech . As well as avoiding lying and deceiving, this precept covers slander as well as speech which is not beneficial to the welfare of others.
Should a Bhikkhu engage to act as a go-between for a man’s intentions to a woman or a woman’s intentions to a man, whether about marriage or paramourage, even for a temporary arrangement, this entails initial and subsequent meeting of the Sangha.

buddhism commandments, Language Skills Abroad
Siddhartha Gautama, the founder of Buddhism who later became known as “the Buddha,” lived during the 5th century B.C.
He decided to give up his lavish lifestyle and endure poverty. When this didn’t fulfill him, he promoted the idea of the “Middle Way,” which means existing between two extremes. Thus, he sought a life without social indulgences but also without deprivation.

buddhism commandments, Language Skills Abroad
A list of Buddhist abstinences
1. to abstain from taking life

buddhism commandments, Language Skills Abroad
There’s an answer, of course. These are not commandments, but guides. We don’t live with judgement; we live with effect. Of course you need to kill something. Even if only for the nourishment. The self-perpetuation.
Growing up Catholic, I learned about commandments. There are ten of them. They are a code of ethics handed down by God to Moses on Mount Sinai, divided into three commandments about treating God right, and seven about treating our fellow humans right.

buddhism commandments, Language Skills Abroad
The Third Noble Truth, the truth of the end of suffering, has dual meaning, suggesting either the end of suffering in this life, on earth, or in the spiritual life, through achieving Nirvana. When one has achieved Nirvana, which is a transcendent state free from suffering and our worldly cycle of birth and rebirth, spiritual enlightenment has been reached. The Fourth Noble truth charts the method for attaining the end of suffering, known to Buddhists as the Noble Eightfold Path. The steps of the Noble Eightfold Path are Right Understanding, Right Thought, Right Speech, Right Action, Right Livelihood, Right Effort, Right Mindfulness and Right Concentration. Moreover, there are three themes into which the Path is divided: good moral conduct (Understanding, Thought, Speech); meditation and mental development (Action, Livelihood, Effort), and wisdom or insight (Mindfulness and Concentration).
The Four Noble Truths are a contingency plan for dealing with the suffering humanity faces — suffering of a physical kind, or of a mental nature. The First Truth identifies the presence of suffering. The Second Truth, on the other hand, seeks to determine the cause of suffering. In Buddhism, desire and ignorance lie at the root of suffering. By desire, Buddhists refer to craving pleasure, material goods, and immortality, all of which are wants that can never be satisfied. As a result, desiring them can only bring suffering. Ignorance, in comparison, relates to not seeing the world as it actually is. Without the capacity for mental concentration and insight, Buddhism explains, one’s mind is left undeveloped, unable to grasp the true nature of things. Vices, such as greed, envy, hatred and anger, derive from this ignorance.

Resources:

http://www.history.com/topics/religion/buddhism
http://tricycle.org/magazine/the-five-precepts/
http://jimringel.com/commandments-different-precepts/
http://www.pbs.org/edens/thailand/buddhism.htm
http://a.aviatrix.com/learning/cloud-security-operations/egress-and-ingress/