god of love

god of love, Language Skills Abroad
Eros was the Greek God of love and fertility. The Romans later called him Cupid.
Winged or not, warm hearted or not, the gods of love and desire would cause the greatest joy and the greatest pain among both Gods and humans – pretty much what happens today as well.

god of love, Language Skills Abroad
G. NIMATALLAH / De Agostini Picture Library / Getty Images
The Roman equivalent of Aphrodite, Venus was a goddess of love and beauty. Originally, she was associated with gardens and fruitfulness, but later took on all the aspects of Aphrodite from the Greek traditions. Similar to Aphrodite, Venus took a number of lovers, both mortal and divine. Venus is nearly always portrayed as young and lovely. The statue Aphrodite of Milos, better known as the Venus de Milo, depicts the goddess as classically beautiful, with womanly curves and a knowing smile.

In later sources, Eros is the son of Aphrodite and Ares, whose mischievous meddling in the affairs of gods and mortals caused bonds of love to form and drama to unfold. In early Greek poetry and art, Eros was depicted as an adult, handsome male carrying a lyre or a bow and arrow. He embodied love, athleticism, sexual power and art. Eros was often regarded as the protector of homosexual love between men.
In the primordial myths, according to Hesiod, Eros was born from Chaos after Gaia and Tartarus and was involved at the beginning of the creation of the cosmos, and he blessed the union of Gaia and Uranus, after which the universe was born. Homer makes no mention of Eros in his epics; however, Parmenides, a pre-Socratic philosopher, had Eros the first of all the gods to come into existence. Eros was responsible for spurring procreation at the beginning of the cosmos. Hesiod described the two love gods, Eros and Himeros (Desire), accompanying Aphrodite from her conception from the sea-foam created by the castration of Uranus.

god of love, Language Skills Abroad
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H.A.Q.Q. is the fourth studio album of transcendental black metal band Liturgy. Featuring their characteristic yearning guitar harmonies, epic song structures, and intense drumming, H.A.Q.Q. boils over with harp, piano, gagaku ensemble, pitched percussion, strings, and digital manipulation. It represents a consolidation of the band’s sound to date, a combination of the mathematical complexity of 2011’s Aesthethica and the glitchy experimental fervor of 2015’s The Ark Work. An open-hearted meditation on sincerity, courage and the nature of the divine, H.A.Q.Q. is perhaps Liturgy’s most personal record, exploring anger, bitterness, and mental health struggles as well as cosmic joy. In part a reflection on Liturgy’s own uniquely controversial career, it attempts to render the spirit of a cultural era whose basic fabric is unravelling, and to at the same time capture flashes of potential that might escape.

Fill my heart with all of you
Make each moment of my days
Tell of who you are
That the world may know
The God of love
Fill my heart with all of you
Make each moment of my days
Tell of who you are
That the world may know
The God of love

Resources:

http://www.learnreligions.com/deities-of-love-and-marriage-2561983
http://greekgodsandgoddesses.net/gods/eros/
http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=1dNmymSI8uQ
http://www.azlyrics.com/lyrics/nathanielbassey/godoflove.html
http://www.grammar-monster.com/glossary/exclamatory_sentence.htm