re prefix

re prefix, Language Skills Abroad
Now your brain will never reject that the meaning of the prefix re- is “back” or “again.” Reflect upon re-, and your vocabulary prowess will never regress!
Regression is the “state of having stepped back.”

Examples of prefixes include:
I can never remember my neighbour’s name.

re prefix, Language Skills Abroad
You probably know many of the common English roots or base words below. Here are the base forms of some Latin roots you might need:
Other prefix and root combinations are not so obvious. Often they have changed from their original meaning over time (like revolution, above.) However, if you understand the meaning of the prefix and of the root, you may be able to come close to the meaning of the new word. Use the context to help you too.

Re- often changes to res- in front of a verb starting with s:
2. To return to a previous location, condition, or state of being

re prefix, Language Skills Abroad

    The pronunciation varies depending on the word, with /ɹiː/, /ɹɪ/(some pronunciations), /ɹɛ/ found in words like replay, resist and revolution, respectively.
  • Sometimes in new coinages and nonce words. stir and re-stir the mixture
  • When the word that the prefix is combined with begins with a capital letter. re-Christianise
  • In British usage, when the word that the prefix is combined with begins with e. re-entry (North American: reentry)
  • When the word formed is identical in form to another word in which re- does not have any of the senses listed above. The chairs have been re-covered (covered again)The chairs have been recovered (obtained back)

re prefix, Language Skills Abroad
Nouns: disappointment, misinformation, reformulation
e.g. prefix + noun noun

(5) Back in a place. This sense, the OED says, can be seen in words like “reprehend” (and “reprehensible”), “retain,” “relegate,” “refrain,” “reserve,” “remain,” “reside,” “relinquish,” and even “rest” (from the Latin restare).
As the OED points out, the meaning of “re-” isn’t always clearly defined, and in many cases new meanings have arisen and obscured the originals.

Rule: Use the hyphen with the prefix re only when re means again AND omitting the hyphen would cause confusion with another word.
Posted on Tuesday, March 30, 2010, at 9:06 am

(1) Back from a point reached, or back to or towards a starting point. This meaning can be seen in “reproach” which in Anglo-Norman meant “to recall (something disagreeable to someone),” the OED says.
(5) Back in a place. This sense, the OED says, can be seen in words like “reprehend” (and “reprehensible”), “retain,” “relegate,” “refrain,” “reserve,” “remain,” “reside,” “relinquish,” and even “rest” (from the Latin restare).

re prefix, Language Skills Abroad
Since Dr. Wells is also the the author of the Longman Pronunciation DIctionary, I think I’m safe combining his transcription systems for clarity in this podcast.
To produce the short e, the front of the tongue is lowered a bit more than the short i. It sounds like (short e).

Resources:

http://www.ecenglish.com/learnenglish/lessons/using-prefix-re
http://www.englishhints.com/the-prefix-re.html
http://www.lawlessfrench.com/vocabulary/prefix-re/
http://english.stackexchange.com/questions/271027/is-there-any-grammar-rule-for-the-usage-of-the-re-prefix
http://www.uefap.com/vocab/build/building.htm
http://www.grammarphobia.com/blog/2011/06/reprefix-re.html
http://data.grammarbook.com/blog/hyphens/hyphens-with-the-prefix-re/
http://www.grammarphobia.com/blog/2011/06/reprefix-re.html
http://pronuncian.com/podcasts/episode118
http://www.momjunction.com/articles/moral-stories-for-kids_00369197/