root word mitt

root word mitt, Language Skills Abroad
Every comic book villain tries his best to contribute wholeheartedly to the demise of his chosen superhero, that is, to his permanent ‘sending away,’ or ‘death;’ the words superhero and demise don’t go together very well. Dr. Octopus could never ‘send away’ Spiderman, at least on a permanent basis!
The English root mit and its variant miss comes from a Latin word that means ‘to send.’

root word mitt, Language Skills Abroad
Butcher Stevens flung himself from the plate, Moffat threw up his mitt in sudden fear.
In 2012, Mitt Romney lost women voters by 11 points, and Republicans lost them by 11 points.

7. Emissary : e MISS ary (em’ i sar ee) n.
Entrance; the permission to enter

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The 100 most common Latin and Greek roots figure in more than 5,000 English derivatives just beyond the average person’s vocabulary of 10,000 words. They are the ones in all CAPITAL letters. By memorizing these 100 CAPITALIZED Latin and Greek prefixes, suffixes and roots, you will have a short cut to sight read an additional 5,000 words. If you learn all of them (both the caps and non-caps roots), you can double this to 10,000 additional words. Most of these words are used in medicine, law, business, science and technology. These are all words you must know in order to excel on the PSAT, SAT I and GRE, to do well in college and to have a successful career. The most important of these derived words are in CAPITALIZED BOLD print. You must know their meanings . Look these words up in your dictionary to get all the definitions. Put them on your index cards; the word on the front and definitions on the back. Many will not have the same exact meaning as the original Latin or Greek words but they will be close. When you use your dictionary, pay close attention to the Latin or Greek words from which they are derived. The Romans also combined prefixes and roots to derive new words. Many were borrowed straight from the Greek language, but most were combined with Latin to make additional words with similar but distinctive meanings. Try to get a feel for the ETYMOLOGY of these words.
1. Latin Prefixes

Resources:

http://www.dictionary.com/browse/mitt
http://www.english-for-students.com/miss.html
http://www.learnthat.org/word_lists/view/13602
http://www.palosverdes.com/jesse/pvphs/www-freecollege-com-vocab.htm
http://membean.com/wrotds/magn-large