the story of the trojan war is primarily an example of which purpose of mythology?

Well, the children grew up, but they never had even the slightest bit of good luck. Every day, from morn till eve, it was always toil and toil, and all merely for the day’s subsistence. As for their clothing, it was just what God sent them! They sometimes found rags on the dust-heaps, and with these they managed to cover their bodies. The poor things had to endure cold and hunger. Life became a burden to them.
One day, after toiling hard afield, they sat down under a bush to eat their last morsel of bread. And when they had eaten it, they cried and sorrowed for a while, and considered and held counsel together as to how they might manage to live, and to have food and clothing, and, without toiling, to supply others with meat and drink. Well, this is what they resolved: to set out wandering about the wide world in search of good luck and a kindly welcome, and to look for and find out the best places in which they could turn into great rivers—for that was a possible thing then.

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the story of the trojan war is primarily an example of which purpose of mythology?, Language Skills Abroad
Greek myth takes many forms, from religious myths of origin to folktales and legends of heroes. In terms of gods, the Greek pantheon consists of 12 deities who were said to reside at Mount Olympus: Zeus, Hera, Aphrodite, Apollo, Ares, Artemis, Athena, Demeter, Dionysus, Hephaestus, Hermes, and Poseidon. (This list sometimes also includes Hades or Hestia). Other major figures of Greek myth include the heroes Odysseus, Orpheus, and Heracles; the Titans; and the nine Muses.
Fragmentary post-Homeric epics of varying date and authorship filled the gaps in the accounts of the Trojan War recorded in the Iliad and Odyssey; the so-called Homeric Hymns (shorter surviving poems) are the source of several important religious myths. Many of the lyric poets preserved various myths, but the odes of Pindar of Thebes (flourished 6th–5th century bce ) are particularly rich in myth and legend. The works of the three tragedians— Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, all of the 5th century bce —are remarkable for the variety of the traditions they preserve.

Resources:

http://www.studyhawks.com/question/the-story-of-the-trojan-war-is-primarily-an-example-of-which-purpose-of-mythology-religion-history-science-philosophy-502519/
http://www.britannica.com/topic/Greek-mythology
http://www.coursehero.com/file/24262560/English-2-pt2-final-examdocx/