where the wild things are moral of the story

where the wild things are moral of the story, Language Skills Abroad
The wild things roared their terrible roars and gnashed their terrible teeth and rolled their terrible eyes and showed their terrible claws. But Max stepped into his private boat and waved good-bye. He sailed back over a year and in and out of weeks and through a day and into the night of his very own room. There, he found his supper waiting for him and it was still hot. Also read, Wild Swans.
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where the wild things are moral of the story, Language Skills Abroad
The Wild Things- Originally seen as savage creatures who, “roared their terrible roars and gnashed their terrible teeth and rolled their terrible eyes and showed their terrible claws,” when Max arrived to their world. Max eventually frightens the Wild Things with a magic trick, and they deem him “the most wild thing of all” and make him king of all Wild Things.
Where The Wild Things Are tells the story of a boy named Max, who is making mischief throughout his house. Max is seen throughout the book wearing a wolf suit, a king’s crown, and a mischievous grin. After chasing the family dog around the house with a fork , Max is sent to his room without any supper by his mother. He then begins a magical journey, in which his room transforms into a new world, with creatures named the Wild Things, where he is soon made king. Max is in control of his life in the land of the Wild Things, but soon finds himself homesick and yearning to go back home to eat his mother’s supper.

June 10 marks the would-be 86th birthday of the late, beloved children’s book author and illustrator Maurice Sendak. He is certainly best-known for his 1963 picture book Where the Wild Things Are, which, despite receiving some negative reviews and being frequently challenged by schools and libraries, was named second on the list of Teachers’ Top 100 Books for Children in 2012 and No. 1 on School Library Journal ‘s Top 100 Picture Books of all time.
It’s clear that Where The Wild Things Are has achieved massive cultural significance decades after its release, but more interesting is why. Maurice Sendak has never been one to shy away from darker themes — which is often the reason his books have been banned. In a 2006 interview with NPR, Sendak explains that he puts his children characters in danger because “kids are so shrewd.”

where the wild things are moral of the story, Language Skills Abroad
They play, but soon, Max commands them to stop and go to bed without supper, and he finds himself lonely as the king of the wild things, and wants to be where someone loves him “best of all.” He returns to his room, where supper is waiting for him, and, with an added reassurance and charm that maybe only Sendak could pointedly portray, Max finds that the food is still hot.
In just 10 sentences, Sendak’s “Where the Wild Things Are,” illuminated not only the protagonist Max’s imagination, but also rage, a reaction to a mother’s emotional absence and the overall darker, and neglected, parts of a child’s psyche.

where the wild things are moral of the story, Language Skills Abroad
That very night in Max’s room a forest grew
Max sailed through night and day and in and out of weeks and almost over a year to where the wild things are

Resources:

http://reviews-of-childrens-literature.pbworks.com/w/page/10581750/Where%20The%20Wild%20Things%20Are
http://www.bustle.com/articles/27544-maurice-sendaks-where-the-wild-things-are-taught-us-these-7-vital-life-lessons
http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/health/2012/05/08/maurice-sendak-the-pointed-psychology-behind-wild-things
http://www.teachingchildrenphilosophy.org/BookModule/WhereTheWildThingsAre
http://www.thoughtco.com/finding-a-theme-of-a-book-1857646